The portrait is falling

The last days of Robert Mugabe

Source: The portrait is falling – The Zimbabwean 20.12.2016 by Martin Fletcher

With considerable trepidation, I took the lift to the sixth floor of the ministry of justice in central Harare to interview the minister. It wasn’t just that I lacked the accreditation foreign journalists must obtain to work in Zimbabwe – the interview had been ar-ranged through unofficial back channels. The minister, Emmerson Mnangagwa, also happens to be the vice-president, Robert Mugabe’s notoriously brutal chief enforcer for the past 36 years, and the most feared man in the country. “They don’t call him ‘The Crocodile’ for nothing,” said a Zim-babwean businessman who knows him well. “He never says a word but suddenly he bites. He’s very dangerous.”But Mnangagwa, still powerfully built at 74, proved courteous enough as we sat in deep leather armchairs in his bright and spa-cious office. It was not in his interest to be hostile – not at this time. He is determined to succeed Mugabe and he will need West-ern support to rebuild his shattered country if he does, which is presumably why he gave me an almost unprecedented interview.

With considerable trepidation, I took the lift to the sixth floor of the ministry of justice in central Harare to interview the minister. It wasn’t just that I lacked the accreditation foreign journalists must obtain to work in Zimbabwe – the interview had been ar-ranged through unofficial back channels. The minister, Emmerson Mnangagwa, also happens to be the vice-president, Robert Mugabe’s notoriously brutal chief enforcer for the past 36 years, and the most feared man in the country. “They don’t call him ‘The Crocodile’ for nothing,” said a Zim-babwean businessman who knows him well. “He never says a word but suddenly he bites. He’s very dangerous.”But Mnangagwa, still powerfully built at 74, proved courteous enough as we sat in deep leather armchairs in his bright and spa-cious office. It was not in his interest to be hostile – not at this time. He is determined to succeed Mugabe and he will need West-ern support to rebuild his shattered country if he does, which is presumably why he gave me an almost unprecedented interview.

Read  full report: martin-fletcher

COMMENTS

WORDPRESS: 5
  • comment-avatar

    Crocodiles may appear friendly when this behaviour is part of their strategy to get their next meal. What was the modus operandi over 50 years ago when the Crocodile gang murdered a civilian Mr. Oberholzer in front of his wife and children near Chimanimani? What was the objective?

  • comment-avatar
    Charles 5 years ago

    “The businessman put it this way: “Maybe
    you don’t like Mnangagwa and his history,
    but you’re faced with a choice. Do you allow
    Zimbabwe to crash and burn and let its people
    suffer? Or do you try to negotiate a rescue
    so they have a future?”

    • comment-avatar
      Joe Cool 5 years ago

      Mnangagwa is not a rescue, Charles, so broaden your options for the future.

  • comment-avatar

    Mugabe and family plus hangers on flew to Singapore last night , using Air Mugabe (actually owned by the taxpayers of Zimbabwe), then they will go to Dubai for Xmas and stay away in sheer luxury for a further 14 days. Hope they don’t come back. This trip will cost us, the taxpayers, at least $3million. Theives, the whole lot of them.

    Read the accompanying article: The portrait is falling. Scary, to think that even after Mugabe we will still have a murderer running this country.

  • comment-avatar

    revolting scum, all of them!!