Zanu PF mouthpieces have failed to convince urban voters 

I always wonder whether those in the Zimbabwe regime, the ruling ZANU PF party, and their mouthpieces – most notably, the various information departments, and state media, such as ZBC, Herald, Sunday Mail – ever self-introspect as to exactly why they have so shamefully and pathetically dismally failed to convince the majority of urban electorate (who make up most of their viewership, listenership, and readership) to vote for ZANU PF.

Source: Zanu PF mouthpieces have failed to convince urban voters – The Zimbabwean

As much as the ruling party’s incomprehensibly unparalleled inaptitude and incompetence is so bare for all to see – and is virtually impossible to comprehensively defend, even by the most skillful of spin doctors – there is, however, one other glaring weakness by the establishment.

They have failed to grasp that the process of information dissemination – or, simply put, propaganda – is an art and science, which requires the utmost exceptional skill.

What we have, nonetheless, witnessed with these people is the reckless, illogical, and uncreative, discharging of propaganda – without any intellectual depth to speak of.

The mere ability for someone to talk too much does not automatically make for a great spin doctor. Neither is the ability to spew vitriol against the opposition, the key to winning hearts.

This regime appears convinced that just having people endlessly speaking glowingly about those in power, or the ruling party – and their policies and programs – is the secret to electoral success.

Just because someone can play the guitar, does not automatically produce another Leonard Dembo! It requires outstanding skill – it’s a gift, in its own right.

In fact, despite the government and ruling party’s own retrogressive and reactionary policies and programs – the incontrovertible lack of distinction in their information and propaganda departments has actually worked to further darken the people’s perception.

If only those in the Zimbabwean corridors of power could take time out to self-evaluate, self-criticize, and self-assess, they would realize that – much to their possible shock – their inability to make inroads in the urban electorate’s hearts is not due to some foreign agents, neither is it a result of a dubiously shady ‘third force’, but lies squarely on its own doorsteps.

Thus, it is quite clear that the ruling establishment in Zimbabwe is its own worst enemy – in more ways than one.

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